Posts Tagged ‘Public Policy’

gun

I have no real aversion to firearms.  I might be getting more libertarian in my old age, where privacy and individual rights are taking on a position of more and more importance. What bothers me about the gun debate is how passionate and emotional people get about guns, on both sides of the issues, without truly emphasizing the facts we know.

It has been said that statistics can lie, be cherrypicked to support whatever position you’re going to stand behind.  I have researched guns and gun violence extensively, and while there are many pro-gun websites and information hubs full of useful and appropriate positions, I double-checked sources and had difficulty verifying many claims.  Below are  studies and statistics verified through multiple sources.

While I don’t have an aversion to guns, I believe all of us need a good understanding of how guns are more than just tools.  Because they are more that just tools.  It is objectively true that a gun has a different effect on our thoughts and behavior than a hammer, or a screwdriver, or a stapler.  Whether or not you believe you should have an unadulterated right to own a gun, you must acknowledge facts and reality.  So here are some facts!  Read them and make your own decisions.

 

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Cat'S Eye Nebula, Ngc 6543, Cosmos, Space, Stars

Each 15 years, the United Nations sets sustainable development goals, priorities for development, to improve our world and human quality of life worldwide.

Until last year, no one looked at the actual effectiveness of the work being done.  A ROI analysis (that’s Return on Investment for those new to the idea) hadn’t been conducted.  Cost/Benefit analysis hadn’t been done, or if they had, it hadn’t been publicized or used to make smarter goals.

Nonprofits often suffer from their very idealism.  Working toward a good cause makes us feel warm and fuzzy.  Often, the causes we support are close to our hearts because of personal experiences.

I once heard nonprofits, and those who work in nonprofits, and those who support them, are terminally optimistic.  We think we can do a lot more than we actually can, make a bigger impact than we can, change more systems than we can.  And these are good causes we’re talking about; regardless of your personal cause, you can agree that having clean air and water, having healthy food, reducing rates of violence…these are good things, things we want.

The trouble is, without those cost/benefit analyses, we aren’t going to be able to do much.

To save the world, we need to prioritize.

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